Tenugui was used as a washcloth or dishcloth since Heian Period (AD 794-1192). Today’s Chusen dyeing technique was developed in the Meji era (1868-1912). Tenugui are dyed by hand, resulting in slightly inconsistency in the color and can enjoy the Blur technique depends on the design pattern. The design permeates the fabric, so that it can be seen clearly on both sides.

手ぬぐいは古くは平安時代から使われてきました。今に伝わる手ぬぐいの染め方「注染」が確立されたのは明治になってからです。職人の手によって染められる手ぬぐいには計算された滲みやボカシの技法がみられ、毎回少しずつ表情が違う仕上がりになります。

両面綺麗に染め上がるのも注染の手ぬぐいの特徴です。

Place the stencil on the wooden frame and spread the resist paste with a wooden scraper. Fold the fabric over for the length of Tenugui and continue spreading the resist paste to each piece of fabric length.

型紙を木枠に貼り、糊付けをします。白生地をてぬぐいの長さで折り返しながら型を置き一枚一枚に糊をつけていきます。

The dye will not be absorbed into the areas covered with the resist paste. That area retains the original white color of the fabric.

糊が置かれた部分は防染され、染料が繊維に行き届く事はありません。糊の乗った部分は元々の生地の色のままとなります。

In order to prevent the resist paste from flowing, place sawdust on both sides.

糊が崩れて流れるのを防ぐ為、糊置きした両面におがくずを付けておきます。

Pour the dye with a tool called Yakan.
Yakan=Kettle
染料をヤカンで注いでいきます。
この注ぐ動作から「注染」という名前がついたと言われています。

Once the dye is poured, pull the dye down with a press. The press machine sucks the dye down. Turn it over and do the same process again.

全体に注いだら、圧搾機で染料を下に引き抜きます。裏返して同じ作業を行い染め上がりです。

To dye more than one color at a time, make a bank with resist paste and pour different color dyes into each enclosed area.

If two or more dyes are poured in one place, “blur dyeing” can be achieved.

一度に2色以上染める場合、糊で土手を作ります。その部分に異なる色の染料を注ぎます。多色を一気に注ぐ事でボカシの表現を可能にします。

Put it in a large washing machine and remove the resist paste. Rinse thoroughly in the another washing area to remove glue and excess dye.
水洗機にかけ、糊を落とします。更に洗い場で充分にすすいでいきます。

Sun-dry as a long fabric. Take up the dry fabric. Fold to the length of the Tenugui by hand. 

長い反物のまま天日干しにします。取り込んで、切って、畳んで手ぬぐいの完成です。

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s